Jump to content

1989 Civic Si some problems


Frost9009

Recommended Posts

Hello Honda people! I have a 1989 Civic Si that i just got. Well it leaked oil out of the valve cover so i replaced the gasket and its good now, new plugs and wires, new fual pump and filter, fresh oil change.

For the bad: All the gauges dont work besides the speed. Milage, fual, odometer, rpms, oil pressure dont work. The Temp guage goes from 0 to max in less then 2 mins when you start to drive and for some reason after i did all that replacements it doesnt want to stay running at a stop light and just running at low speeds. low rpms i guess but i cant find the idle. Anyone know what the problems can be caused by? All the fuses i can see are good. I am just stomped why its acting up. Please share your wisdom and intellect i really need the help lol i want to restore this baby! I have a part time job and some bills so putting it in a shop and he the pros do it isnt an option for me at this time. Please throw out suggestions! lol im in need

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You need:

Helm Publishing Service Manual for car

Amp/Ohm Meter from Radio Shack, approx. $9.00

Wires with Alligator Clip ends

Wrenches: 6mm – 19mm

Thermometer with top end of 300ºF-350ºF

 

I am not sure what size the thermosensor will require, but you need to remove it after draining your coolant system. Take some coolant in a pot and set it on the stove and set your stove to high. Suspend the thermosensor in the coolant with the contacts out of the coolant. Attach the sensor to your Amp/Ohm Meter and watch the meter and your thermometer. If the resistance does not change in the appropriate range, the sensor is bad. Refer to the service manual for correct operating temperatures.

 

If your fuses are good, which I assume you checked the engine bay as well, and the thermosensor is good; then your car could be overheating as a result of several factors.

 

 

Next would be to inspect the radiator cap, thermostat, radiator, and water pump; in that order. I have organized them from cheap and easy, to expensive and hard.

 

If all the above is in order, then you may have an internal issue that can be anything from cracked sleeves to warped head. These are all things that can only be remedied with the proper equipment found in a machine shop. Only these “pros” can grind off small amount of metal from your block to correct any deformation there may be.

 

I will let others chime in on the other issues that I have less experience with.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You need:

Helm Publishing Service Manual for car

Amp/Ohm Meter from Radio Shack, approx. $9.00

Wires with Alligator Clip ends

Wrenches: 6mm – 19mm

Thermometer with top end of 300ºF-350ºF

 

I am not sure what size the thermosensor will require, but you need to remove it after draining your coolant system. Take some coolant in a pot and set it on the stove and set your stove to high. Suspend the thermosensor in the coolant with the contacts out of the coolant. Attach the sensor to your Amp/Ohm Meter and watch the meter and your thermometer. If the resistance does not change in the appropriate range, the sensor is bad. Refer to the service manual for correct operating temperatures.

 

If your fuses are good, which I assume you checked the engine bay as well, and the thermosensor is good; then your car could be overheating as a result of several factors.

 

 

Next would be to inspect the radiator cap, thermostat, radiator, and water pump; in that order. I have organized them from cheap and easy, to expensive and hard.

 

If all the above is in order, then you may have an internal issue that can be anything from cracked sleeves to warped head. These are all things that can only be remedied with the proper equipment found in a machine shop. Only these "pros" can grind off small amount of metal from your block to correct any deformation there may be.

 

I will let others chime in on the other issues that I have less experience with.

 

Thanks for your reply! I will see what i can do. Oh what are the sleeves you are talking about?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The practical answer to your question about the sleeves is that: you don't want to know.

 

The technical answer is: the "sleeve" is a relatively thin plate metal cylinder the piston moves within. This sleeve sits in a camber filled with coolant, and the outside of the chamber is the outside of the engine.

 

If you ever had to take Physical Chemistry in school, it is the same concept as a bomb calorimeter.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

lol , check your grounds and fuses dude. ground under the hood on thermo housing or tranny from engine wiring harness. if there all good , get a cluster like your cars and try it.

Edited by cranny
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Guidelines
We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.