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rph9168

1989 CRX si

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1989 Honda CRX Si. Really clean. Supercharged 1.6 liter rebuilt with less than 50,000 miles. Supercharger recently rebuilt. Lowered on coilovers and cambered so all wheels on contact with the ground. 3” exhaust from the headers. Racing seats with aftermarket steering wheel. 16” racing wheels. Not running right now. Needs head gasket. $3,900 or best offer. Call or text Tyler at 770-289-6386 or email at rph9168@aol.com

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hi my friends

The Honda CR-X, originally launched as the Honda Ballade Sports CR-X in Japan, is a front-wheel-drive sport compact car manufactured by Honda between 1983 and 1991. It was replaced by the Honda CR-X del Sol for the 1992 model year. Although there are many supposed definitions for the acronym CR-X, the most widely accepted is "Civic Renaissance X".

In the US, the CRX (not CR-X) was marketed as an economy sport Kammback, with room for two passengers. The European-spec car received a ZC 130 hp (97 kW) engine and a 2+2 seating arrangement. Redesigned in 1988 and produced to 1991, the CRX was popular for its performance, nimble handling, and good fuel economy. Honda's 1992 CRX del Sol was marketed as a CR-X in some markets.

Overview

For the 1984 model year, Honda introduced an all-new two-seater that shared the drivetrain with the Civic but offered unique styling and interior furnishings. In North America, the CRX was marketed in two versions: economy and sport. The economy model used a new aluminum 1.3 liter CVCC engine. The sport model featured an aluminum 1.5 liter four cylinder with three valves per cylinder and available with a 5-speed manual or 3-speed automatic.

For 1985, Honda replaced the economy model with an HF (high fuel) model featuring a 1.5 liter engine which uses an aluminum block but the 1984 CVCC cylinder head (two valves per cylinder) instead of the new aluminum head with three valves per cylinder. In spring 1985, Honda introduced an Si (Sports, injected) model featuring a more powerful 1.5 liter SOHC PGM-FI engine. خرید کرم ضد آفتاب The Si model included a power sunroof, standard dual remote exterior mirrors, rear wiper, 13-inch alloy wheels and an Si-exclusive ducktail spoiler for the hatch.

For 1986, Honda updated the CRX with new aerodynamic headlights. The Si received body color matched lower cladding, a revised rear spoiler, new bumper covers and 14-inch alloy wheels. The interior was upgraded and added a center console with cassette tape storage. 1987 was virtually unchanged from 1986 and would be the final year of the first generation CRX.

The first generation CRX was sold in some regions outside Japan as the "Honda Civic CRX". At its introduction, the CRX was available in Japan through Honda Verno dealership sales channels, and accompanied the Vigor, the Quint, and the Prelude.

220px-Honda-BalladeSportsCR-X1.5i.JPG
 
1987 Honda Ballade Sports CR-X 1.5i (Japan)

Drivetrain

The Japanese Si and European 1.6i-16 models came with a 1590 cc DOHC engine putting out 135 bhp (101 kW; 137 PS) in the UK-spec model and 140 bhp (104 kW; 142 PS) in the JDM model. Though similar versions of the same engine, the Japanese Si engine was stamped ZC, while the European engine was stamped ZC1.

Japanese buyers took advantage of the largest, 1.5 L, engine while still paying the same amount of annual road tax.

220px-1987_Honda_CRX_Si%2C_rear_right_%2
 
1987 Honda CRX Si (U.S.)

Fuel economy

The original 1.3 liter car (chassis code AE532) had an EPA highway mileage rating of 52 miles per U.S. gallon (4.5 l/100 km; 62 mpg‑imp) in 1984 and was reported to often achieve over 70 miles per U.S. gallon (3.4 l/100 km; 84 mpg‑imp) in favorable driving conditions. The later 1.5 liter American-market CRX HF (high fuel economy) model (chassis codes EC1 and AF) could also reliably achieve very good gas mileage, more than a decade before gas-electric hybrids appeared on the market, and at no price premium over the base model; the 1.5 liter is rated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (under the new rating system) at 42 miles per U.S. gallon (5.6 l/100 km; 50 mpg‑imp) city and 51 miles per U.S. gallon (4.6 l/100 km; 61 mpg‑imp) highway

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