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f22b2 engine swap/rebuild/scrap


fad9567

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Its me from the 96 accord that thought it was a boat and went through that huge puddle, cracked a piston arm and took a chunk out of the oil tube(?) under the crank, it looks like thats its purpose to move oil around, my main question is what are my options of either rebuilding it, swaping a new motor, or just making piece and selling it

 

i know its a f22b2, it had 180k car got a clutch a year ago and new cv axels, tranny worked well so this is why i hate to sell it now, im getting a 91 accord lx five speed from my brother, so I do have some time to work on this one.

 

Any help would be great along with prices, I am in college and this is main concern if i have to drop 4 grand i might as well start to look for something else newer. If I scrap the whole car how much could one get with out getting robbed, its a four door with fair condition, it ran well but deffintaly shows its age, thanks for all the help in the Huge Puddle thread!

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f22s would be really cheap and salvage yards would be overflowing with them. i have never priced one before, but I would guess 200-300 for a complete motor sounds right. probably only 100-200 more to include a transmission already attached. If you have the tools and a place you and a friend or two should be able to switch it out in an afternoon or find a local independent service garage and get a quote from them if they provide the salvage motor and if you provide one. keep in mind, if you provide the motor and there is a problem with it the service guy will charge you for any further work. if they sell it to you it should come with at least a "runs until you get home guarantee".

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I have take two years auto tech in high school so I know some things about cars and motors, what clear signs should i look for when trying to get a good motor from a salvage yard, and any specials tools to pull a motor out, I have a basic mechanics set, and would it just be a plug and play swap, like everything should just come out and then plug back in and crank when all plugged in?

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Should be that easy, probably won't be.

 

Biggest hurdle you will likely have are the axle nuts. I don't know the size of yours on your car, but the civic is something absurd like a 32mm. Pull out the haynes or google search it, you can buy a cheap impact set from harbor freight that will work, or borrow-a-tool from most car parts shops for that one. Air will help a lot, or find a hoss-ass breaker setup. I last used a craftsman impact socket, with my 1/2 drive ratchet and a 6 foot galvanized pipe and it still required some soaking with pb and heat. oh, and i broke my ratchet doing it too, #%@&!

 

Signs? A warranty. A reputable place will often give you a guarantee for around 30 days. The engine will often have been given a cursory cleaning and should have a record of the donor cars original mileage. Double check for any broken sensors. Not that you couldn't reuse yours, but no need to have to get out screw extractors to fix a snapped sensor bolt cause some dude was lazy.

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how hard is it to pull the motor out, is there any way i could avoid having to buy a cherry picker or something, could two guys hook it up with some chain to a 4x4 piece of wood and just heave it out?

 

Is there anything that has to be specailly done to mate the tranny with it too? Or just take it out with the motor and swap it out of the car? That sounds the best route but not sure.

 

I have the Haynes Manual and I guess that has how to pull the motor, havent looked at it for a motor pull, I guess I will be when I get off work

 

@ Xeryon - Dont know what I clicked but a read -1 came up in the bottom of your post so i went to the other post and hit the green one, nothing against you just accidentlly click and it came up.

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No problem, just a reputation system that no one really uses.

 

On civics I have seen pictures of guys that took the motors out through the bottom in their garage, but the process was pretty nuts. I can move a 1.6 with the trans attached myself, and it can be easily carried with two people. A 2.2 will be quite a bit heavier but I would randomly guess the engine and trans to weigh around 600-700 pounds, maybe. A 4x4 should hold that. Whether you and a buddy can lift that I don't know. Normally you would pull the motor with the trans attached and reinstall the same way but it is not terrible to take the trans off to lighten the lifting load.

 

If you lack a lift capacity you can usually rent them from most auto parts stores as well.

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  • 5 months later...

hey, im doing an engine swap right now of a 2.2l SOHC Non Vtec, same engine and car as yours, the axle nuts are 34mm, and if u have a manual transmission you will need a clutch alignment tool for when u bolt up clutch to flywheel. my engine blew same way where the cylinder 3 connecting rod broke and took out oil pickup tube. but mine was from high rpms and nitrous. also for better clearance take off the harmonic balancer, if removing engine and tranny through top, and remove hood. and to save on possibly breaking upper ball joints, un bolt the upper control arms from under hood. any other issues u come across, feel free to email me at mcintyreautosports@gmail.com Good Luck!

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  • 3 weeks later...

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