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Ball Joints


ACCORDing2Cory

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I recently heard a squeak in my front end when i pushed down on the fender......so i got under it while my dad pushed down on the car n i went under n felt around but no luck on finding anyhting squeking...........i thought it was a bushing or something that was dry......so i took it to a shop n they said it was prolly my ball joints.........so they poked a HOLE omg in my top one injected lube n grease into it n sealed it with silcone, remind u this is november n it was cold........then they lowered it we pushed on it no luck...........so they did the same to the bottom ball joint thankfully it worked...........so i was just wondering is this how u fix a squeaking ball joint or is this just temporary........and will the silcone hold up in the cold weather........all together parts n labor 26 bucks

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The lubricant needs to be replaced periodically, it does age.

 

They should have been using any NLGI #2 GC-LB grease, not silicone.

 

I did this lubrication exchange on my own. I did not puncture the boot, rather I seperated the joint from knuckle and slipped off the boot. Then wiped all the old grease off with a shop towel and fingered some Valvoline Synthetic NLGI #2 GC-LB grease into the boot and ball joint. After reassembly, I bounced the car up and down a few times to work the grease in and no more squeeky ball joints.

 

It sounds like you're at the mercy of the mechanic (if so good luck), unless you have all the tools needed to remove the knuckle and just decided not to mention it. You will likely get charged 1-2 of labor for replacing about 4 oz of lubricant, sorry.

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I recently heard a squeak in my front end when i pushed down on the fender......so i got under it while my dad pushed down on the car n i went under n felt around but no luck on finding anyhting squeking...........i thought it was a bushing or something that was dry......so i took it to a shop n they said it was prolly my ball joints.........so they poked a HOLE omg in my top one injected lube n grease into it n sealed it with silcone, remind u this is november n it was cold........then they lowered it we pushed on it no luck...........so they did the same to the bottom ball joint thankfully it worked...........so i was just wondering is this how u fix a squeaking ball joint or is this just temporary........and will the silcone hold up in the cold weather........all together parts n labor 26 bucks

 

Honestly I can't believe that I am bothering to respond at all, SPELL THINGS OUT! Not everyone wants to spend their time read through people's text bla bla bla... If a joint is dry, lube will be a temporary fix to the sound, but just plan on replacing it. It is not worth your life. You do not know the overall condition of the joint.

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If a joint is dry, lube will be a temporary fix to the sound, but just plan on replacing it. It is not worth your life. You do not know the overall condition of the joint.

Really??? I squeezed most of the lube out in messing with the knuckle and they started to squeek. I just put new lube in. I just figured they were fine. I get that if you drive continuously with bad joints you deteriorate the socket, and I get that if you have no idea how long it has been dry then driving on it is a gamble.

 

So what would you say about my situation, 3 days of squeeking after my fumbling pushed out the lube: new joints?

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Well, with your generation (as well as my own 95') I have twice seen the shaft break in half (a.k.a. the shaft that connects the joint to the lower control arm). I would inspect the shaft below the ball for pitting, hair line cracks, corrosion and any other sign of fatigue (essentially where the boot rests on the lower control arm, you will have to pull the boot down). The joints at the dealer should only run about 30 each. This brings up a wierd topic, if you were in the shop and the joints were dry we would simply replace them (there is too much liability associated with not replacing them), but as a person that works on your own car it is up to you to determine the best route. You can also check the joints for play by 1. with the car off the ground using a pry bar, placing it between the rim and the crown nut and prying then lower arm up and looking for compression of the boot (a.k.a. play in the joint), and then 2. by placing the pry bar between the lower control arm and the knuckle where the joint is pressed in and pry them apart and check for movement. If there is no play in the joint and the shaft of the joint appears OK, then it is up to you to decide what you want to do. Then to, how the joints wear and fatigue in the north may certainly be different the down there in FL.

 

I wish I could give you a better answer. I will say this though, you can get just the boots for the upper ball joints, out tie rod ends, and lower ball joints. Thereby you can if the boots are cracking or dry rotting, you can replace the boots and re-pack the joints, but that is only worth doing if the integrity of the joints warrant. This is somthing I have done to my personal car, but then again at a shop there is the added liability.

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I understand. I stopped working on my co-workers Hondas because I started to learn about liability and got paranoid. I didn't want them to do something stupid and come back and blame me.

 

I will think about what you said, good response.

 

One more question, is the ball joint seat tapered up or down (narrow side top or bottom). I'm just wondering if you use the air chissle pointed up or facing down.

 

Hear is a good example for you. Lower front ball joint replacement (accords). Look at what the book says and hear is how we do them.....

 

Remove the 17mm crown nut. Remove the 36mm spindle nut. Pop the lower ball joint with one solid hit. Pull the knuckle off the axle and turn it towards the back of the vehicle and strap it back to hold it in place. Remove the ball joint boot. Use an air chissle (Snap-on's work the best) with a blunt point or hammer head to drive the old ball joint out. Take your new ball joint and put it in the freezer (contraction) for and while (15 mins usually does the trick). Take a plumbers tourch and heat the knuckle where the ball joint goes (expansion). Take the ball joint out of the freezer and put it in the knuckle. Using a brass or bronze punch working in a circular motion tap the new joint in. Bolt everything beck together in the reverse. The whole job takes about 15 minutes start to finish in the shop. Now would you rather do that or remove the whole knuckle assembly and press it out and press the new one in?

 

The book way works, but it is not always the best or fastest way.

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Tappered from top to bottom. I.e. you will have to removed to boot and drive it up from the boot side (bottom side). With the new joints in the freezer for a while, you should be able to get them started and tap around the top outside rim of the new joints to place them (good size bronze punch and hammer does the trick, or you can use the air chissle with a hammer head attachment, but you have to be more careful that way in order to not hurt the new joint). Wear safety glasses with either method (bronze flakes and eyes don't get along). I have not seen an Accord come with a C-clamp, but look at the bottom side of the knuckle after the boot is removed to see if there is one. Civics used to come stock with them. If it is there, then that will have to be removed inorder to drive the joint up and out.

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