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5th Gen Accord USDM: Digital Climate Control (a/k/a the CL dash swap)


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#1 James Matteu

James Matteu

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  • Location:Jacksonville, FL
  • Vehicles:1997 Honda Accord EX-V6

Posted 09 June 2008 - 09:20 AM

To go from this:

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to a fully operational Digital Climate Control:

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Parts

The list price is given in parethesis

Dash Temperature Sensor:
Sun Beam Sensor ($47.45) Acura P/N 80510-SY8-A01

Console Temperature Sensor:
In-Car Sensor Assembly ($37.92) Acura P/N 80530-SR3-941
Outer Aspirator Hose ($14.45) Acura P/N 80533-SV4-941
Inner Aspirator Hose ($183.45) Acura P/N 80532-SV4-A41
Aspirator ($22.77) Acura P/N 80533-SV4-A41
Aspirator Joint ($4.57) Acura P/N 80534-SV4-A41
4x20 Tapping Screw ($1.50) Acura P/N 90123-SV4-003
4x20 Tapping Screw ($1.50) Acura P/N 90123-SV4-003

External Temperature Sensor:
Ambient Sensor ($27.45) Acura P/N 80525-SS0-942
Ambient Sensor Bracket ($5.87) Acura P/N 80521-SV4-940
6x16 Bolt-Washer ($0.82) Acura P/N 93403-06016-04

A/C Core Temperature Sensor:
Evaporator Sensor ($20.97) Acura P/N 80560-SV4-A41
Brown Connector Clip ($2.05) Acura P/N 91556-SP0-003

Climate Control Buttons/Display:
Automatic Air Conditioner Computer Assembly ($591.18) Acura P/N 79610-SY8-A02
Automatic Air Conditioner Switch Assembly ($302.65) Acura P/N 79650-SY8-A01

Ventilation & Ducts:
Passenger Side Air Conditioner Duct Assembly ($35.82) Acura P/N 77430-SY8-A00
Driver Side Air Conditioner Duct Assembly ($35.82) Acura P/N 77420-SY8-A00
Center Air Conditioner Duct Assembly ($29.85) Acura P/N 77410-SY8-A00
Medium Taupe Driver Side Outlet Assembly ($59.43) Acura P/N 77620-SY8-A01ZC
Medium Taupe Passenger Side Outlet Assembly ($60.52) Acura P/N 77630-SY8-A01ZC
Medium Taupe Center Outlet Assembly ($91.13) Acura P/N 77610-SY8-A01ZC
Medium Taupe Right Side Defroster Garnish ($25.67) Acura P/N 77471-SY8-A00ZC
Medium Taupe Left Side Defroster Garnish ($25.67) Acura P/N 77476-SY8-A00ZC

Blower Control:
Transistor Assembly ($120.80) Acura P/N 79330-SF1-941
Power Relay Assembly, 4P Denso ($33.80) Acura P/N 39797-SE0-003

Air Mix Control Motor:
Auto Mode Motor Assembly ($124.92) Acura P/N 79160-SV4-A41
The arm that is moved by the Auto Mode Motor Assembly, screwed onto the heater casing, needs to be removed as well. There is no part number for this peice, it is part of the blower unit housing.

CL Dash:
Upper Instrument Pad ($541.53) 77102-SY8-A00ZC (medium taupe), 77102-SY8-A00ZA (classic gray)
Passenger Side Wood Grain Instrument Panel ($93.37) Acura P/N 77211-SY8-A00ZB
Driver Side Wood Grain Instrument Panel ($25.05) Acura P/N 77216-SY8-A00ZB
Black Meter Panel Assembly ($64.40) Acura P/N 77200-SY8-A00ZA
Beige Driver Side Instrument Cover ($25.03) Acura P/N 77210-SV4-A00ZE
Beige Passenger Side Instrument Cover ($16.12) Acura P/N 77215-SV4-A01ZJ
Beige Lower Instrument Cover Assembly ($67.15) Acura P/N 77300-SV1-A10ZE
Driver Knee Bolster ($65.98) Acura P/N 77893-SV4-A20
Meter Cover ($18.78) Acura P/N 77205-SY8-A00

CL Switches:
Cruise Control Switch Assembly ($56.15) Acura P/N 36775-SY8-A01
Roof Switch Assembly ($33.00) Acura P/N 35830-SY8-A01

Wires:
Dashboard Wire Harness ($771.68) Acura P/N 32150-SS8-A12
This part is not necessary if you cut each connector and pigtail off when removing components from the donor car. If you already have the harness or otherwise are stuck with one, remove the wires needed for this swap.

Optional:
Wood Grain Console Panel ($111.58) Acura P/N 77297-SY8-A10ZA, Honda P/N 08Z05-SV4-100
Note: Honda P/N 08Z05-SV4-100 is not available through any dealership, the item is discontinued

I sprung for the optional wood console and still only spent $300.28, so take it from me, get your parts from the salvage yard.


Installation Part One: Removing the Accord Dash

TURN YOUR CAR OFF, LET IT SIT FOR 3 MINUTES or you could inadvertently deploy the SRS.

BEFORE PROCEEDING, DISCONNECT THE BATTERY

1. Rear Console removal:
Cup holder first, then the little door (or CD holder) under the arm rest. Remove 3 screws (see below) and then pull up and back (toward the rear seats). The console should come right out.
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2. Front Console Panel/Contents removal:
Take out your ash tray, then remove 3 screws and pull back and up (see below). There are 6 retainer clips holding the front console in; if the metal part pops off, pull it out and slide it back on the Front Console Panel. Once the panel is removed, loosen the two screws holding the radio/pocket bracket. The stereo/pocket should come loose, now unplug the DIN, Antenna Lead, and C444.
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3. Removing all switches from the Instrument Panel:
Remove the Steering Column Lower Cover at this point. It is the plastic that is in front of your knees when you are in the driver seat. The Steering Column Lower Cover covers the metallic Driver's Knee Bolster that is bolted behind it. It is only held in by retainer clips, so just pull on it until it pops out. Reach up under the Instrument Panel and push the switches from behind to pop them out. Remove the Moonroof/Cruise Control switch (C603 and C604), Dash Brightness controller (C605), and the Rear Defogger switch (C613).

4. Instrument Panel removal:
Remove the 6 screws holding it in: 1 behind the Moonroof/Cruise Control switch, 1 behind the Dash Brightness controller, 2 above the Gauge Assembly, 2 below the A/C Controls. Pull gently on the Instrument Panel to remove it. As the panel starts to come out, insert your hand inside to push it from behind. Remove the Heater Control Panel Connectors: C611 and C612. Remove the Air Mix Control Cable, it is held down with one Philips head screw and the end is looped onto a peg. The Instrument Panel should be free, set it aside.

5. Gauge Assembly removal:
Remove the 4 screws holding it in: 2 on bottom, 1 left, and 1 right. Pull the Gauge Assembly out and disconnect the three green connections at the top: C607, C608, and C609. If you plan on using the CL Gauge Assembly, the following alteration to the Accord Gauge Assembly is not necessary. Cut the plastic tabs on the sides of the Gauge Assembly (where the left and right screws were just removed from). Leave about 5-6 millimeters of the base of the tab; this will wedge the Gauge Assembly in the Black Meter Panel Assembly that comes with the CL dash.

6. Remove the Front Console:
Open the Glove Box, insert a quarter into the right side slot and turn counter-clockwise (the peg should come out), pull up on the tab on the left and remove that peg. The glove box should drop down. Remove the 6 screws holding the Front Console in: 2 black screws on the left (they were covered by the Steering Column Lower Cover), 2 black screws on the right (they were covered by the Glove Box), 2 silver screws in the middle (they were covered by the Front Console Panel).

7. Remove the Driver's Knee Bolster:
There are 4 bolts with 10 millimeter heads holding the Driver's Knee Bolster in. The Driver's Knee Bolster is hooked on the left and right, you will need to pull up and back once the bolts are out in order to unhook it.

8. Remove the Front Passenger's Airbag Assembly:
Remove the Spring-loaded Lock Connector from the blue clip on the side of the Air Bag, C704. Disconnect the Spring-loaded Lock Connector by pulling the spring-loaded sleeve toward the stop while holding the opposite half of the connector, then pull the connector halves apart. Note: Be sure to pull on the sleeve and not on the connector half itself. Remove the 5 lower mounting nuts holding the Front Passenger's Airbag Assembly, then remove the Front Passenger's Airbag Assembly by pushing it up.

9. Remove the Dash Pad:
Remove the left and right side Defroster Garnish with a flat head screw driver. Remove the tweeters the same way, but the tweeters will come out a bit and then be wedged up against the window, turning the tweeter either clockwise or counter-clockwise (depending on the side, I cannot remember which way I turned it) will release it from the dash far enough to disconnect them (C606 and C617). Remove 6 bolts: 2 in the middle, 1 behind the Left Defroster Garnish, 1 behind the Right Defroster Garnish, 1 behind the Glove Box, 1 behind the Driver's Knee Bolster. Pull back on the dash (one small tug on each side), until the ducts are visible from below. Remove the ducts: the center one has one screw in the middle (insert your hand into the duct to find it), the driver's side duct is held by two screws (one next the driver's side vent, one inside the duct on the heater core end), and the passenger's side duct is held by two screws (one behind the duct on the under side of the dash, one inside the duct on the heater core end). Once the ducts are out, you can remove the wire harness that is attached to the underside of the dash. Note: the white clips that hold down the harness are difficult to remove, they can be helped with a flat head screw driver, but some may break or break the pegs they are attached to, be prepared. Unscrew the Driver and Passenger side Instrument Covers from the sides of the dash, there are 4 screws holding on each. Removing these will allow you to remove the dash without damaging your leather wrapped steering wheel. The dash should come right out now.

10. VIN Change Over:
Use a 3mm drill bit to remove the rivets holding the VIN onto the Accord dash. The rivet you use to afix the VIN plate on the CL dash depends on how big of a hole you have on your VIN plate, which may or may have not been enlarged by the drilling process. I was lucky and ended up using a smaller rivet.


Installation Part Two: Sensors

1. Evaporator Temperature Sensor:
Disconnect the A/C Thermostat (C445). Slide the transistor from its plastic bracket. Remove the four self-tapping hexagonal shaped screws, two mounting nuts and the mounting bolt. Remove the two self-tapping Philips screws from the A/C Lower Housing. Remove the metal clip in the front with a flat head screw driver. The A/C Housing will now be loose enough that you can pry apart the Upper and Lower A/C Housings and pull the entire A/C Housing away from the Heater Core Housing, which allows you to insert your hand into the A/C Housing to pull the thermistor clip from the Evaporator fins. Remove the Accord thermistor from the clip
Insert the Acura CL's Evaporator Temperature Sensor in the Accord's thermistor clip. Insert the clip and sensor on the Evaporator where the thermistor was. Re-assemble the A/C Housing by pushing the A/C Upper and Lower Housings back together and replacing all bolts, screws and the metal clip.

2. Ambient Air Temperature Sensor:
Remove each Front Turn Signal Light by loosening the screw found behind the access hole to the left and right of the grill. Each Front Turn Signal Light should come out, disconnect them: C203 and C303. Remove the two black plastic clips beneath the bumper. Remove the four bolts (2 on each side) that are now visible since the Front Turn Signal Lights have been removed. Remove the small bolts found at the top side of the bumper behind the inner fenders. The bumper should come out now, lift up and pull back.
Using the threaded hole already on the radiator support (see below), attach the Ambient Air Temperature Sensor. Run two 20 AWG wires (one for sensor output, one for ground) from the sensor to the Passenger Side Inner Fender. Pass the wires along the Right Engine Compartment Wire Harness, protect the wires you add with Plastic Corrugated Tubing (a/k/a Loom) and zip tie the new harness to the Right Engine Compartment Wire Harness. There is a large grommet past the fire wall that the Right Engine Compartment Wire Harness passes through, push the wires through here and pull them through from the inside of the car. Later we will connect them to the Acura CL's Climate Control System.
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3. In-Car Temperature Sensor:
The Heater Core Housing comes ready to accept the Acura CL's Aspirator (see below). Posted Image
The hole is not open, but the plastic the Heater Core Housing is made of is easily cut. I used a 5 inch steak knife with a sharp tip and slightly flexible blade, to push through the plastic. I poked enough holes to pull the center out (see below). Don't pull the peg from the center like I did, I thought it would help, but instead I could have used the peg to pull the center out when I had cut enough of the edges.
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Now the Acura CL's Aspirator can be installed (see below).
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The Heater Core Housing comes ready to accept the Acura CL's Aspirator Joint (see below).
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Install the Driver's Knee Bolster from the Acura CL; it will have the proper mounting location for the In-Car Sensor Assembly.

4. Sunlight Sensor:
Nothing will need to be changed for this sensor to be installed, simply follow the wiring instructions below.

5. Coolant Temperature Sensor:
Nothing needs to be added, the Accord already has a Coolant Temperature Sensor. The wiring instructions will show how to tap into this sensor at the TCM.


Installation Part Three: Wiring


Connection Nomenclature 101
As you should have seen above, Honda labels each connection with a letter C and a number. Each ground is labeled in a similar fashion, with a G supplanting the C. The Acura manuals do not always number the connections or grounds, and the naming system varies by location in the vehicle.

Colors
Honda uses the following abbreviations for the colors they use to identify their wires, so will I:
BLK………...black
BLU………...blue
BRN………...brown
GRN………..green
GRY………..gray
LT BLU……light blue
LT GRN……light green
ORN………..orange
PNK………...pink
PUR………...purple
RED………...red
WHT………..white
YEL…………yellow
In the pin-out lists below, the first color listed for a particular wire is the color of the wire, the second color is the color of the stripe running down the length of the wire. Additionally, Honda will sometimes paint a wire with a silver stripe to differentiate it from other wires of the same color scheme. In the example below, these are the numbers in parenthesis. In the example, the BLU/RED wire had no silver stripe, the ORN/BLK wire had 2 silver stripes, and the ground wire, the black wire, also had no stripe. If I didn't put a number in parenthesis, I don't know what is painted on the wire.

Numerology
Honda numbers the wires in a connection, left to right, top to bottom. The numbering is done by first orienting the connection with the clip up and facing away from you, i.e. female end facing away. For example, in this photo, you see the A/C Power Transistor Connection:
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the large (14 or 16 AWG) Blue wire with Red stripe at the top is #1; the small (20 AWG) Orange wire with Black stripe on the bottom left is #2; and the Black wire with no stripe on the bottom right is #3. The connection is labeled as follows:

A/C Power Transistor
1 BLU/RED (0) Fuse #17, 12V, 30A, Hot at all times
2 ORN/BLK (2) Power transistor control
3 BLK (0) G403

Unoccupied spaces
Sometimes, not all the pins in a connection are used. Sometimes Honda numbers the empty spaces and then labels them on the pin-out diagrams as "Empty". Sometimes Honda skips over the spot, draws an X in the square on the pin-out diagram; and continues with the number convention without skipping any numbers. So a 15 pin connection may only appear to have 14 pins on the corresponding wire diagram.

On with the pin-outs:

5th Gen Honda Accord:

C611 (15 pin) Heater Control Panel
1 GRN/WHT - Recirculation Control Motor: Fresh
2 BLK - G404
3 GRN/RED - Recirculation Control Motor: Recirculate
4 LT GRN/WHT (2) – Mode Control Motor: Vent
5 LT GRN/BLK (2) - Mode Control Motor: Bi-Level
6 LT GRN/RED (1) – Drive Circuit
7 GRN – Main A/C Switch (-), goes to the Heater Control Panel: Heater Fan Switch
8 BLU/RED – Main A/C Switch (+), A/C Thermostat input
9 RED – Dim Control (-)
10 RED/BLK – Dim Control (+)
X Empty
11 BLK/YEL – Fuse #8, 12V, 7.5A, Hot with key in the ON position
12 BLU (2) - Mode Control Motor: Defrost
13 BLU/RED (2) - Mode Control Motor: Heat/Defrost
14 YEL/GRN (2) - Mode Control Motor: Heat

C612 (8 pin) Heater Control Panel: Heater Fan Switch
1 GRN – from the Main A/C Switch
2 BLK – G403
3 Empty
4 Empty
5 BLU – Fan speed #1
6 BLU/YEL – Fan speed #2
7 BLU/BLK – Fan speed #3
8 BLU/RED – Fan speed #4

C613 (6 pin) Rear Window Defogger Switch
1 YEL/GRN (2) – to defogger relay and defogger timer circuit
2 RED (1) – Dimming Control Circuit (-)
3 BLK/YEL (2) – Fuse #8, 12V, 7.5A, Hot with key in ON position
4 BLK (2) – G404
5 RED/BLK (1) – Dimming Control Circuit (+)
6 YEL/WHT (2) – to defogger timer circuit

Pins 2, 3, 4, and 5 are not needed to run the digital climate control

C618 (4 pin) Recirculation Control Motor
1 BLK/YEL – Fuse #8, 12V, 7.5A, Hot with key in ON position
2 GRN/WHT - Recirculation Control Motor: Fresh
3 Empty
4 GRN/RED - Recirculation Control Motor: Recirculate

C619 (5 pin) Blower Motor Resistor
1 BLU/RED (0) – Fuse #17 (via relay), 12V, 30A, Hot with key in ON position
2 BLU/BLK - Fan speed #3
X Empty
4 BLU/YEL - Fan speed #2
5 BLU - Fan speed #1

Changes to C619 for the swap:
To provide the Acura CL's climate control with a Blower Motor feedback, remove pin 1 on C619 and use it to replace pin 1 on the Acura CL's A/C Power Transistor connector.
To provide a connection from the Acura CL's climate control to control the Acura CL's A/C Power Transistor, remove pin 5 on C619 and use it to replace pin 2 on the Acura CL's A/C Power Transistor connector.
To provide a connection from the Acura CL's climate control to control the Acura CL's Blower Motor High Relay, remove pin 4 on C619 and use it to replace pin 4 on the Acura CL's A/C Blower Motor High Relay.
Pin 2 is not needed to run the digital climate control.
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C436 (7 pin) Mode Control Motor
1 BLK/YEL (1) - Fuse #8, 12V, 7.5A, Hot with key in ON position
2 BLU (2) - Mode Control Motor: Defrost
3 BLU/RED (2) - Mode Control Motor: Heat/Defrost
4 YEL/GRN (2) - Mode Control Motor: Heat
5 LT GRN/BLK (2) - Mode Control Motor: Bi-Level
6 LT GRN/WHT (2) – Mode Control Motor: Vent
7 LT GRN/RED (1) – Drive Circuit ground

C445 (3 pin) A/C Thermostat & Thermistor
1 BLU/YEL – to A/C Pressure Switch
2 BLU/RED – to C611 pin 8
3 BLK/YEL - Fuse #8, 12V, 7.5A, Hot with key in ON position

Changes to C445 for the swap:
To provide the CL's climate control with a uninterrupted connection to the Engine Control Module via the A/C Pressure Switch, cut or remove pins 1, 2, and 3 from C445, then solder the BLU/YEL to the BLU/RED.
To provide voltage from Fuse #8 to the CL's Blower Motor High Relay, run a wire connecting the now cut BLK/YEL wire on C445 to the BLK/YEL wire on the CL's Blower Motor High Relay.

C467 (2 pin) Blower Motor
1 YEL/BLK (0) – G403
2 BLU/RED (0) – Fuse #17 (via relay), 12V, 30A, Hot with key in ON position

In this swap, nothing changes for C467

C603 (6 pin) Cruise Main Switch

For the swap, the Accord connection needs to be supplanted for the CL's connection. All wires match in color.

C605 (3 pin) Dash Lights Brightness Controller

For the swap, this control unit moves to the other side of the Gauge Cluster; so add 8-10 inches of wire to the harness, behind the connection. This will allow enough slack to move the control unit to the other side of the Gauge Cluster

1st Gen Acura CL:

For the CL connectors, I will either give a short description of what the pin is for, or simply give the name of its analogous pin on the Accord, you can look above to see what the description is.

Climate Control Unit: Connector A (the black one), BC

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1 ORN/BLK (2) – C612 pin 5
2 GRY (2) – 5V reference from the Air Mix Control
3 GRN/WHT (2) – C611 pin 1
4 GRN/RED (2) – C611 pin 3
5 BLU (2) – C611 pin 12
6 BLU/RED (2) – C611 pin 13
7 YEL/GRN (2) – C611 pin 14
8 LT GRN/BLK (2) – C611 pin 5
9 LT GRN/WHT (2) – C611 pin 4
10 BLU/YEL (1) – C611 pin 8
11 Empty
12 YEL/GRN (1) – Sensor ground *
13 WHT/RED (2) – Sunlight Sensor input
14 RED/WHT (1) – Engine Coolant Sensor, run a wire to RED/WHT on C461
15 BRN/WHT (1) – Ambient Air Temperature Sensor input
16 YEL/RED (2) – In-Car Temperature Sensor input
17 PNK/BLK (2) - Air Mix Control potential input
18 BRN (1) - Evaporator Temperature Sensor input
19 BLU/ORN (1) – C612 pin 6
20 Empty

* attach all 5 sensor YEL/GRN ground wires to one wire that leads to pin 12

Climate Control Unit: Connector B (the grey one), GC

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1 BLK/YEL (1) – C611 pin 11
2 Empty
3 RED/WHT (2) – Air Mix Control "Cool"
4 RED/YEL (1) – Air Mix Control "Hot"
5 BLU/RED (1) – C612 pin 8
6 WHT/YEL (1) – Memory, 12V, 7.5A, Hot all times, wire this to the stereo's WHT/YEL wire (C429 pin 4)
7 RED/BLK (1) – C611 pin 10
8 RED (1) – C611 pin 9
9 BLK (2) – C611 pin 2
10 LT GRN/RED (1) – C611 pin 6
11 YEL/GRN (2) – C613 pin 1
12 YEL/WHT (2) – C613 pin 6

A/C Power Transistor
1 BLU/RED (0) – repin with C619 pin 1
2 ORN/BLK (2) – repin with C619 pin 5
3 BLK (0) – G403, see "Make a connection to G403" below

Blower Motor High Relay
1 BLU/RED (0) – connect to the BLU/RED wire now attached to the A/C Power Transistor without severing that wire
2 BLK/YEL (1) – connect to BLK/YEL on C445
3 BLK (0) – G403, see "Make a connection to G403" below
4 BLU/ORN (1) – repin with C619 pin 4

Make a connection to G403:
Solder both BLK wires to a third 10 AWG wire that has a loop at the end. Bolt the loop to the chassis G403. This will ground both BLK wires coming from the Blower Motor High Relay and A/C Power Transistor to G403.

Air Mix Control
1 RED/YEL (1) – GC pin 4
2 YEL/GRN (1) – BC pin 12 *
3 GRY (2) – BC pin 2
4 PNK/BLK (2) – BC pin 17
5 RED/WHT (2) – GC pin 3

Ambient Air Temperature Sensor
1 YEL/GRN (1) – BC pin 12 *
2 BRN/WHT (1) – BC pin 15

Evaporator Temperature Sensor
1 YEL/GRN (1) – BC pin 12 *
2 BRN (1) – BCC pin 18

In-Car Temperature Sensor
1 YEL/GRN (1) – BC pin 12 *
2 YEL/RED (2) – BC 16

Sunlight Sensor
1 YEL/GRN (1) – BC pin 12 *
2 BRN (1) or WHT/RED (1) – BC pin 13

* attach all 5 sensor YEL/GRN ground wires to one wire that leads to pin 12


A wiring diagram is in a later post see below (I would say the last page, but that may change), I have reached the photo limit for one post.


Installation Part Four: the CL dash

From this point on, the installation is pretty much in reverse of the Accord dash removal. Some tips and highligts are listed below.

Remove the Upper and Lower Steering Column Covers, it's held in by 3 screws. Remove the Driver and Passenger Side Instrument Covers from the Acura CL dash, they are held on by 4 screws. Attach the under-dash harness in the same places the harness was attached in the Accord; be sure to run the connection for the Sunlight Sensor out of the hole at the top of the dash. Once the harness is in place, install the three black ducts. Once the ducts are in place the dash goes back in pretty much the same way it came out.

Auto Mode Motor Assembly:
Some of the passenger side heat vent will need to be cut to make room for the Auto Mode Motor Assembly (see below). The mounting posts for the Auto Mode Motor Assembly should already be on the bottom of the Heater Core Housing, don't forget to replace the metal arm the motor actuates.
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When installing the Gauge Assembly, the fitment is tighter than with the Accord dash. The Gauge Assembly should be inserted one side at a time, then set into position once inside the dash. Note: the Gauge Assembly will only be held in by two screws, but the 5-6 millimeters left when the side tabs were removed will laterally stabilize the Gauge Assembly. Additionally, the Black Meter Panel Assembly will press the Gauge Assembly against Meter Cover.

Last step for this section is to reconnect the battery and turn the key.


Installation Part Five: Doors

Please pardon my dust, this section is still under construction. It is a work in progress, and I own a sedan, not a coupe.

Coupe:

Panels:
The Door Panels from the CL should be a direct swap to the Accord Door Panel, the Handle Assembly is a different story.

Switches:
The Door Lock Switch Assembly from the CL matches both Accord sedan and coupe; even the connection matches.
The Master Power Window Switch Assembly connector should be either a direct swap or only slightly different. Repining or soldering should be to a minimum.
The Remote Control Mirror Switch Assembly is a direct swap and you get the added bonus of obtaining a Mirror Defogger Switch (for non-Canadian North American models).

Lights:
The Courtesy Light Assembly is the same. Even the connection is the same.

Inside Handles:
The Inside Handle Assembly from the CL will need to be swapped in for the Accord set. I haven't figured out where the Inside Handle Assembly needs to be screwed in against the door, although I have read on the internet that the Lock Knob Rods from the CL will need to be used since the distance from the Inside Handle Assembly to the Power Door Lock Assembly is greater than in the Accord.

Sedan:

Panels:
A new Door Panel may have to be created from a CL Door Panel top and an Accord Door Panel top that has been reattached to the Accord Door Panel bottom.
The front of CL Door Panel top, back to the Inside Handle Assembly, is needed to utilize the CL's Inside Handle Assembly. From the CL's Inside Handle Assembly to the rear of the CL Door Panel top is a different story. I haven't decided how exactly to do this, but will keep this thread posted.

Switches:
The Door Lock Switch Assembly from the CL matches both Accord sedan and coupe; even the connection matches.
The Accord's passenger side Power Window Switch Assembly is located at the Inside Handle Assembly. On the CL, Power Window Switch Assembly is located on the Passenger Door Grip. This presents a problem, as in switching to the CL Door Panel top, you potentially loose the Power Window Switch Assembly found on the Accord. On the driver's side, there is no problem and nothing changes; if a new Door Panel can be created as described above.
The Remote Control Mirror Switch Assembly is a direct swap and you get the added bonus of obtaining a Mirror Defogger Switch (for non-Canadian North American models).

Lights:
The Courtesy Light Assembly is the same. Even the connection is the same.

Inside Handles:
The Inside Handle Assembly from the CL will need to be swapped in for the Accord set. I haven't figured out where the Inside Handle Assembly needs to be screwed in against the door. The Lock Knob Rod from the CL may or may not be needed. The distance from the Inside Handle Assembly to the Power Door Lock Assembly is much shorter in the sedan relative to the coupe, but this distance with the CL components may be greater than the OEM setup in the Accord sedan. I will keep this thread up to date on any developments.


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Wood Console Acura P/N 77297-SY8-A10ZA, Honda P/N 08Z05-SV4-100
For those of you with the 1996-97 Accord, that have the Mild Beige/Taupe color scheme, the faux wood may be just as appealing to you as it is to me. For the Mild Beige/Taupe crowd, installing the optional faux wood center console may be just what your looking for to complete the look. For the 1994-95 crowd, the faux wood may not be as appealing since instead of Mild Beige, you have a yellowish tan color.

Other Colors
For everyone else, you may want to consider either painting the faux wood that comes with the dash to either match the dash padding (or another color of your choice, see below). The dash garnish is a hard plastic that can flex a little bit, so a paint designed for plastics (paint with a flex agent) will be needed. Alternatively, one could easily score the garnish and glue on a carbon fiber veneer.
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THIS IS A WORKING SWAP!!!!
There are quite of few threads written by persons that either installed the digital display for show, i.e. they got power to it but no sensor signals. One guy even used the entire CL harness (OBD-II) and bought a conversion harness for his '95 Accord Coupe (OBD-I), instead of opening the CL harness and sourcing the wires he needed, :crazy: . In my swap, all temperature sensors are in their appropriate locations so that the computer can properly control/adjust the temperature autonomously, i.e. the system will function properly.

Reason for doing this swap
'Cause digital climate control kicks a$$ and it's cheaper than doing a Right Hand Drive Conversion (RHDC) which is essentially what you would need to do to use the JDM 5th Gen Accord Climate Control. If you have money like that, spring for the InterNavi (Honda's JDM DVD Navigation for 5th Gen Accords) along with the RHDC.

Advantages for 5th Gen Accords
When compared to other digital climate control swaps, this is better because:
1. the Acura CL heater valve control function is not vacuum controlled.
2. the Acura CL is built on the Accord platform, so fitment is not an issue.
3. Acura CL parts are easier to find in most area of the US, and are often cheaper than JDM parts
4. I did most of the research and documentation, just follow my instructions.

Authored by James Matteu
Vehicle: 1997 Honda Accord EX V6 with leather and alloys

Edited by James Matteu, 05 July 2009 - 07:23 PM.


#2 wannaBstuntin

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Posted 09 June 2008 - 11:29 AM

Looks like a good project. That will be interesting going from dial climate controls to digital.

Unfortunately I can't be of much help with this.
I know this is a dumb question, but have you searched for the faux wood yet?
It should be easy to find, because I've even found faux wood/carbon fiber dash kits for my 05 Civic.

#3 cranny

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Posted 09 June 2008 - 11:31 AM

i honestly like the accord dash better , lol.

#4 James Matteu

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Posted 09 June 2008 - 11:55 AM

I know this is a dumb question, but have you searched for the faux wood yet?
It should be easy to find, because I've even found faux wood/carbon fiber dash kits for my 05 Civic.

I have


The Plan:


Step 1: Initial research
Seach the internet to see if this has been done before, or go to bone yard and perform preliminary swap to ensure fitment.
Status: Done, here, here.

Step 2: Invested research
I will go to the bone yard the Saturday after next, to buy the tops of the door panels from a CL and Accord sedan. I will use a pot of boiling water to remold the fiberglass and/or remove the vinyl. I will use 3M spray adhesive to reassemble the door panel; essentially fabricating a cross between the CL door panel and the Accord sedan door panel.
Status: Fiberglass research completed. PVC research completed, invested research phase abandoned in lieu of a Plan B: Accord door panels will be reused.

Step 3: Planning
I will buy the 1997-1998 Acura CL Electrical Troubleshooting Manual sometime before the first Saturday of July, but after the door panels have been fabricated. I will use the manuals to decide how to route the wiring and what the CL's components need to function properly. I will put up the pin-out diagram the day after.
Status: Done.

Step 4: Preparation part 1
I will obtain from the CL: climate control, vent plumbing (if necessary), dash, temperature sensors, cruise control switch, and the necessary plugs or wires. I will look for the optional faux wood center console for the Accord, but will opt for the CL standard equipement if necessary.
Status: Done.

Step 5: Preparation part 2
All necessary wires will be prepped with corrugated tubing.
Status: Aborted, it would be a waste to cut wire without knowing exactly how long to make it.

Step 6:
Dooooo eeeeet!
Status: Done!!!!


Projected Cost:

Door Panels: $50.00 ea
Dash, vents: $250.00
Climate Control: $30.00
Transistor: $10.00
Ducts: $60.00
Center Consol: $90.00
Cruise Control: $10.00

Total Projected Cost: ~$500.00


My Budget:
$800.00


Money Spent:

$11.38 for a CD that has:
1997-99 2.2/3.0 CL Body Repair Manual (List price: $42.00) Acura-Honda P/N 61SY830,
1997 2.2 CL Shop Manual (List price: $62.00) Acura-Honda P/N 61SY800,
1998-99 CL 2.3 Shop Manual (List price: $64.00) Acura-Honda P/N 61SY804,
1997-98 3.0 CL Shop Manual Supplement (List price: $38.00) Acura-Honda P/N 61SY803,
1999 CL 3.0 Shop Manual Supplement (List price: $38.00) Acura-Honda P/N 61SY805,
all in pdf.

$45.00 for "1997-1998 Acura 2.2/3.0 CL Electrical Troubleshooting Manual" (List price: $46.95) Acura P/N 61SY804EL

$126.84 for the:
Dash Temperature Sensor,
Consol Temperature Sensor,
A/C Core Temperature Sensor,
Climate Control Buttons/Display,
Ventalation & Plumbing,
Blower Control,
CL Dash,
and the CL Cruise Control Switch.

$20.65 for the External Temperature Sensor and Air Mix Control Motor

$6.21 for 20ft of tubing (0.29/ft.)

$4.23 for the Transistor Assembly pigtail

$85.92 for the optional Wood Console


Total Spent: $300.23

Edited by James Matteu, 24 June 2008 - 06:37 AM.


#5 James Matteu

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Posted 10 June 2008 - 12:39 PM

Well that was easy. About 5 minutes of searching and I found instructions on how to remold the CL door panel or to dismantle both CL and Accord panels and reassemble them with some 3M adhesive.

I found some publication online:


Uniform Procedures For Collision Repair: PR-11 Plastic Repair, Adhesive v.2.3. Copyright 1998 Inter-Industry Conference On Auto Collision Repair:

1. Description: This procedure describes methods for making adhesive repairs to most types of exterior and interior automotive plastics. Procedures for reshaping plastic parts are also included.

9.2 Reshaping: 3. Heat the distorted area with a...or submerge in a hot water tank. The surface should be heated to 70-80 degrees Celsius.

#6 EH6TunerDaniel

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Posted 10 June 2008 - 12:44 PM

I like the Accord dash better too, lol.

#7 James Matteu

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Posted 10 June 2008 - 02:52 PM

I have always been fond of the faux wood, keep in mind my interior is tan/taupe.

I never wanted to do it since it was not consistant with the look of the dash, i.e. there is NO faux wood anywhere else in the car; and the gastly venier crap people glue onto their dashes looks nasty.

I peeped the JDM climate control for the JDM Accord long ago, but realized doing anything short of a RHD conversion, the parts would never look right in a USDM Accord.

The day I sat in that CL in the bone yard, it all made sense, I had a moment of clarity :o . Yeah, I had a monkey touching the monolith moment; I saw a baby in Jupiter.

Keep in mind, the wood accents can all be sanded and painted any color, they are hard plastic. In fact, it would save my swap budget 80-90 dollars; but I actually LIKE the wood. I could see someone painting the wood accents to match the exterior color of the car.


If all works well, this will be one of the least expensive Climate Control installs available; every other Honda appears to have to source JDM Hondas for parts, but 5G Accords can pull everything from the CLs.

There is even a writeup out there for a JDM climate control for a Prelude, and some of the parts are sourced from the CL.

Edited by James Matteu, 10 June 2008 - 02:56 PM.


#8 Tubbith

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Posted 12 June 2008 - 06:45 AM

So, im not sure how in the hell i missed this thread(or mine being jacked) untill now... Basically the reason everything from my car ('98 3.0 CL) fits into your car.. is b/c they are the same thing...my car was built of the '97 accord platform, so everything is pretty much the same. At least under the hood, and for the most part, the interior.

Hows the dash planning/swap going?

Edited by Tubbith, 12 June 2008 - 06:55 AM.


#9 James Matteu

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Posted 12 June 2008 - 07:11 AM

I'm so excited about this Friday, I might just go ape sh*t and strip the CL out if I have the time; I only have 4 hours to giter done.

I know for a fact that the CL I have my eyes on is missing the Instrument Cluster Trim, so even if I get everything else, the final install will not be done for some time; which give me time to plan out the electrical system. I need to work out the numbers in comparing/contrasting the CL and Accord circuits to make sure I don't dump to many DC amps over any one component. If necessary, I will incorporate relays, fusible links, or in-line reistors to drop amps to safe levels.


Some electrical problems I have read about on the internet in doing this swap:

Toasted Transistor - I realize that means they had a poorly fused circuit (to protect the transistor), and poorly managed amperage.

Missing sensor - doesn't apply to me, the JDM Prelude digital climate control has 5 sensors, the CL only needs 4. People with Preludes have to add pins to the CL harness, mine will be fine coming out of the CL since the CL's computer will not be looking for a fifth input.

Poor Mode Control - If the modes operate on a stepped voltage, the digital output may be incorrectly interpreted by the motor. Imagine the mode control responds to sound, in the Accord each position is communicated to the motor with: a whisper, a call, and a shout. If the CL uses the same concept, and the circuit controls its mode with: a whisper, a shout, a scream; then the Accord motor will only respond to the CL digital output by either selecting position one and three, no matter what buttons are pushed. So I will work out the numbers and see if a resistor can turn the volume down on the CL's digital output. I may end up taking the CL mode control to avoid the problem, but I will figure this out for people to follow my instructions and avoid any unecessary costs.


My ramble:

This morning I was thinking about the differences between the CL and Accord dash, the way the black trim extends out from the Instrument Cluster on the Accord and seems to wrap around the two center vents and climate controls. I was thinking about how the CL does not do this, rather how the climate control is incorporated into the dash, stylistically isolating it from the driver. I have been pondering this, and have come to really appreciate Honda's ability to communicate the purpose of a component in the way it's designed, i.e. its "look".

The digital climate control is not part of the driving experience; it is aesthetically isolated from the driver since its purpose is to be set (at a particular temperature) and ignored. This design allows the driver to concentrate on driving, rather than fumbling with the climate controls.

Edited by James Matteu, 12 June 2008 - 07:31 AM.


#10 Tubbith

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Posted 12 June 2008 - 07:14 AM

Sounds like you have your work cut out for you with the number crunchin...

#11 James Matteu

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Posted 12 June 2008 - 07:49 AM

Naw, takes me back to my two favorite Chemistry classes: Electronics for Scientists, and Physical Chemistry. In those classes, I had to work in both digital and analogue, AC and DC.

I got a C in both classes, but I worked my butt off for that C and learned tons of info.

Two Electrical Engineers failed Elec. for Sci., a third got a B, 5 students dropped the course in the first week, and the 3 Physicists each made an A. It was a small class held inside the biggest pile of electronics "junk" from the past 60 years.

My instructor was nutty, he told us if we wanted to take out a small section of a power grid, and can hold the police off long enough: you make a fire large enough to reach a high-voltage high-tension line. The plasma in the flame conducts electricity, so the line will discharge to the ground, drawing too much voltage through the circuit and shutting down the line at the nearest station, then if the fire is hot enough, it softens the line until it snaps under its own weight.

P. Chem. was even more difficult, all the Electrical Engineers dropped out of that class; it was only an elective for them. I only worked in digital, but had to make use of several types of sensors and connect them into circuit boards interfaced with a virtual workstation.

That's how I am able to identify the A/C sensor in the CL by sight, and realize it is actually a commonly available temperature transducer. When I get the books, will just find the specs and buy a generic one (they are like 10 cents for 5 at Radio Shack).

Edited by James Matteu, 12 June 2008 - 07:53 AM.


#12 Tubbith

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Posted 12 June 2008 - 07:52 AM

lol.. sadly, you sound like your speaking french to me.. i really need to get my lazy ass back in school before i forget everything i have already learned...


Sounds like you will be having fun doing this though... so its all good.

#13 James Matteu

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Posted 13 June 2008 - 12:35 PM

For $124.00 I got the following parts groups (group total list price), see above for the part numbers in each group:

Dash Temperature Sensor ($47.45)
Consol Temperature Sensor ($266.16)
A/C Core Temperature Sensor ($23.02)
Climate Control Buttons/Display ($893.83)
Ventilation & Plumbing ($252.05, less the Passenger Side Outlet Assembly)
Blower Control ($154.60)
CL Dash ($917.41)
CL Cruise Control Switch ($56.15)
Heated Seat Switches, qty. 2 ($126.08x2) Acura P/N 38535-SS8-A01
and I cut each pigtail from the Dashboard Harness ($771.68)

Yippee! I saved $3,510.51, and I didn't have to switch to GEICO.


The heated seat switch is for a future project, I just thought I would get them today.

I also forgot to grab the switch for the heated mirrors (another future project).

I was running late (I had to still come to work today), so I didn't have time to swap out the driver and passenger ducts for better looking ones. I am still contemplating the effort to do that or just fix the ones I have or buy new ones. I also didn't have time to grab the external sensor or see if there was anything left of it (both CLs were hit from the front and behind). The one I got the dash from was side-swiped too, which is why the ducts were broken where they attach and why the Passenger Side Outlet Assembly was busted. I will have to find another Outlet Assembly or just pick one up at the dealership.

The door panels wasted alot of my time.

The door panels could be reshaped to fit, but I found out that they are not fiberglass, rather they are PVC. The reshaping would involve heating the plastic, which releases toxic dioxins, which is why Honda doesn't use PVC in their interiors anymore (since the manufacturing process releases these dioxins as well).

Even if I did reshape the door panels, the lock system on the CL coupe is designed differently compared to the Accord and would take a significant amount of time to adapt to my sedan, I felt that I was beginning to digress; on to plan B.

Plan B: I will learn to live with dash not seeming to "flow" with the look of the doors, or paint the faux wood trim to match the dash color. Even if the trim is painted, the contours of the dash will not flow with the doors. I would like to keep the wood, since I do LIKE the faux wood, it is something I can tackle at a later date, so for now, it waits.

I plugged in the CL's Roof Switch Assembly (Acura P/N 35830-SY8-A01) in place of my Accord switch and was able to control the moonroof without any problems. No alterations were needed, the switch even uses the same plug :laugh: .

Edited by James Matteu, 15 June 2008 - 11:33 AM.


#14 James Matteu

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 10:32 AM

According to Carol at the Florida Department of Motor Vehicles, Jacksonville Office: Florida statute allows the removal of the dash mounted VIN tag from the new dash so that the correct tag from my vehicle can be installed in its place. Rivets are recommended but not required.

#15 James Matteu

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 10:31 PM

Tonight, I received the books I ordered the other day. I worked non-stop to arrange the re-wire instructions, I will post them along with a pin-out diagram once I have completed everything and assured the system is in working order.

On a side note:

Anyone have any idea what to do with a wire that is hot in the ON key position with 12V at 7.5A?

I don't need it and I am not sure of the best way to isolate the wire; if your curious as to why I don't need it, keep reading.

The Accord uses a thermistor wired to a transistor (a bipolar junction transistor, NPN) to thermally regulate the compressor function.
The CL uses a thermistor wired to a computer to do the same job.
The Accord's thermistor needs an additional voltage source to run the transistor, since I will not be using a transistor, I will also not be needing the additional voltage source.



Edit: I found a home for this wire, I am using it to power the relay.

Edited by James Matteu, 18 June 2008 - 06:11 AM.


#16 James Matteu

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Posted 17 June 2008 - 10:01 PM

I was pleasantly suprised to see the Heater Unit already has the mounting locations for installing the aspirator and aspirator hose.

I put up the wiring pin-outs and wiring instructions, the rest of the installation instructions is soon to come along with pics of the install when I gidder done this weekend.

Edited by James Matteu, 17 June 2008 - 10:07 PM.


#17 James Matteu

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Posted 20 June 2008 - 07:42 AM

I was pleasantly suprised to see the Evaporator Unit already has a notch in the side for the CL's thermistor. In fact, the place where the CL's thermistor would go is where the Accord's thermistor is now. I would like to find out if the thermistor the Accord uses is the same as the thermistor that the CL uses, but I don't think my multimeter can put out 12v, <10mA, to check for resistance, but I will verify that first.

If both vehicles use the same resistor in their thermistors, then the swap is even easier in that one would only need to cut off the transistor in the Accord and hard wire the existing thermistor into the climate control.

#18 James Matteu

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Posted 23 June 2008 - 11:28 PM

Well that was fun.

22 hours: starting at 1pm Saturday and finishing at 2pm on Sunday; I slept from 4:40am Sunday to 7:40am Sunday. It should be quicker for someone to follow in my foot steps, I double checked everything as I went along and took pictures here and there while taking notes.

Everything looks good, you can check out the pics in the first post; I finished the installation instructions.

While I was under the dash, I did some restoration, I think the air comes out with greater force because of this.
Posted ImagePosted Image


I disconnected something sending power to the foglights, I will check it out next weekend.

804

Edited by James Matteu, 23 June 2008 - 11:49 PM.


#19 airjordan223

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Posted 23 June 2008 - 11:52 PM

wow that was the most intense write-up ive ever seen. really nice job mayne

#20 James Matteu

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Posted 23 June 2008 - 11:59 PM

Thanks!